World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

Plos Computational Biology : Cellularly-driven Differences in Network Synchronization Propensity Are Differentially Modulated by Firing Frequency, Volume 7

By Fink, Christian, G.

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0003931015
Format Type: PDF eBook :
File Size:
Reproduction Date: 2015

Title: Plos Computational Biology : Cellularly-driven Differences in Network Synchronization Propensity Are Differentially Modulated by Firing Frequency, Volume 7  
Author: Fink, Christian, G.
Volume: Volume 7
Language: English
Subject: Journals, Science, Computational Biology
Collections: Periodicals: Journal and Magazine Collection (Contemporary), PLoS Computational Biology
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Plos

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Fink, C. G. (n.d.). Plos Computational Biology : Cellularly-driven Differences in Network Synchronization Propensity Are Differentially Modulated by Firing Frequency, Volume 7. Retrieved from http://www.nationalpubliclibrary.info/


Description
Description : Spatiotemporal pattern formation in neuronal networks depends on the interplay between cellular and network synchronization properties. The neuronal phase response curve (PRC) is an experimentally obtainable measure that characterizes the cellular response to small perturbations, and can serve as an indicator of cellular propensity for synchronization. Two broad classes of PRCs have been identified for neurons : Type I, in which small excitatory perturbations induce only advances in firing, and Type II, in which small excitatory perturbations can induce both advances and delays in firing. Interestingly, neuronal PRCs are usually attenuated with increased spiking frequency, and Type II PRCs typically exhibit a greater attenuation of the phase delay region than of the phase advance region. We found that this phenomenon arises from an interplay between the time constants of active ionic currents and the interspike interval. As a result, excitatory networks consisting of neurons with Type I PRCs responded very differently to frequency modulation compared to excitatory networks composed of neurons with Type II PRCs. Specifically, increased frequency induced a sharp decrease in synchrony of networks of Type II neurons, while frequency increases only minimally affected synchrony in networks of Type I neurons. These results are demonstrated in networks in which both types of neurons were modeled generically with the Morris-Lecar model, as well as in networks consisting of Hodgkin-Huxley-based model cortical pyramidal cells in which simulated effects of acetylcholine changed PRC type. These results are robust to different network structures, synaptic strengths and modes of driving neuronal activity, and they indicate that Type I and Type II excitatory networks may display two distinct modes of processing information.

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • Plos Computational Biology : Replication... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Detection o... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Combining N... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Development... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Localized L... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : a Mathemati... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Exhaustive ... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : the Raven T... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Transcripto... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Integrated ... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Fast-or Slo... (by )
  • Plos Computational Biology : Structure-b... (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from National Public Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.