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Impact of Irrigation and Drainage Management on Water and Salt Balance in the Absence of Capillary Rise

By Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

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Book Id: WPLBN0000708627
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 79,620 KB.
Reproduction Date: Available via World Wide Web.

Title: Impact of Irrigation and Drainage Management on Water and Salt Balance in the Absence of Capillary Rise  
Author: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: United Nations., Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. FAO agriculture series, Agriculture
Collections: United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

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Agriculture Organization Of The United Nations, F. A. (n.d.). Impact of Irrigation and Drainage Management on Water and Salt Balance in the Absence of Capillary Rise. Retrieved from http://www.nationalpubliclibrary.info/


Description
Nutrition Reference Publication

Summary
Electronic reproduction.

Excerpt
Excerpt: The basis for understanding the impact of irrigation and drainage management on the salt balance is the water balance of the rootzone. The water balance of the rootzone can be described with the following equation: (1) where: Ii = irrigation water infiltrated which is the total applied irrigation water minus the evaporation losses and surface runoff (mm); Pe = effective precipitation (mm); G = capillary rise (mm); R = deep percolation (mm); ET = evapotranspiration (mm); and ?Wrz = change in moisture content in the rootzone (mm). On a long-term basis, it can be assumed that the change in soil moisture storage is zero. The water balance then reads: (2) where: R* = net deep percolation, R-G (mm). Therefore, the depth of water percolating below the rootzone is the amount of water infiltrated minus the water extracted by the plant roots to meet its evaporation demands. The fraction of water percolating from the rootzone is called the leaching fraction (LF).


 

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