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The Art of Not Being Governed

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Title: The Art of Not Being Governed  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Political anthropology, Anthropology, Alak people, Southeast Asia, Band society
Collection: 2009 Books, Anthropology, Books About Anarchism, History of Anarchism, Southeast Asia
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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The Art of Not Being Governed

The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia is a book-length anthropological and historical study of the Zomia highlands of Southeast Asia written by James C. Scott and published in 2009.[1]

Contents

  • Synopsis 1
  • Related topics 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4
    • Reviews 4.1

Synopsis

For two thousand years the disparate groups that now reside in


  • The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia review by Foreign Affairs
  • History of people without history review by The Hindu
  • The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia review by The Independent Institute
  • Life on the Edge review by Reason
  • The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia review by Reviews in History
  • The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia review in Journal of Folklore Research Reviews

Reviews

  • Foreign Policy: Why It's Hard For Strongmen To Leave

External links

  1. ^ a b "Refugees' Descendants in Southeast Asia Prove Stateless Society Is Possible".  
  2. ^ "The mystery of Zomia".  
  3. ^ a b "The Battle Over Zomia".  

References

Related topics

Scott admits to making "bold claims" in his book[3] but credit many other scholars, including the French anthropologist Pierre Clastres and the American historian Owen Lattimore, as influences.[3]

history,” is the first-ever examination of the huge literature on state-making whose author evaluates why people would deliberately and reactively remain stateless. Among the strategies employed by the people of Zomia to remain stateless are physical dispersion in rugged terrain; agricultural practices that enhance mobility; pliable ethnic identities; devotion to prophetic, millenarian leaders; and maintenance of a largely oral culture that allows them to reinvent their histories and genealogies as they move between and around states. anarchist This book, essentially an “[2][1]

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