World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Practical theology

Article Id: WHEBN0008906947
Reproduction Date:

Title: Practical theology  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Outline of Christian theology, Christian ethics, Divine presence, Gerald O'Collins, Richard Krejcir
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Practical theology

Practical theology is an academic discipline that examines and reflects on religious practices in order to understand the theology that is enacted in those practices and in order to consider how theological theory and theological practices can be more fully aligned, changed, or improved. Richard Osmer explains that the four key questions and tasks in practical theology are:

  1. What is going on? (descriptive-empirical task)
  2. Why is this going on? (interpretative task)
  3. What ought to be going on? (normative task)
  4. How might we respond? (pragmatic task)[1]

Practical theology consists of several related sub-fields: applied theology (such as missions, evangelism, religious education, pastoral psychology or the psychology of religion), church growth, administration, Darrell Guder et al.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Osmer, Richard Robert (2008). Practical Theology: An Introduction. William B Eerdmans. p. 4. The Core Tasks of Practical Theological Interpretation 
  2. ^ Gerben Heitink, Practical theology: history, theory, action domains: manual for practical theology (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1999) [1]
  3. ^ Christian Boyd, "Formed and Always Being Reformed as a Community Under the Cross", Luther Seminary, Doctoral Thesis, May 30, 2010. p. 9-11; 30-34.


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from National Public Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.