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Amunet

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Title: Amunet  
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Subject: Ancient Egyptian religion, Ancient Egyptian concept of the soul, Ancient Egyptian funerary practices, Amduat, Apep
Collection: Amun, Egyptian Goddesses
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Amunet

Amunet in hieroglyphs


imnt
the hidden one


[1][2]
imnt
the hidden one
Bas relief of Amunet in Luxor.

Amunet (; also spelled Amonet or Amaunet) was a primordial goddess in Ancient Egyptian religion. She is a member of the Ogdoad and the consort of Amun.

Her name, meaning "the female hidden one", was simply the feminine form of Amun's own name.[2] It is possible that she was never an independent deity, as the first mention of either of them is in a pair.

By at least the Twelfth dynasty (c. 1991–1803 BC) she was overshadowed as Amun's consort by Mut, but she remained locally important in the region of Thebes where Amun was worshipped, and there she was seen as a protector of the pharaoh.[1]

At Karnak, Amun's cult center, priests were dedicated to Amunet's service. The goddess also played a part in royal ceremonies such as the Sed festival. Amunet was depicted as a woman wearing the Red Crown and carrying a staff of papyrus.[2]

In late texts from Karnak she was syncretized with Neith, although she remained a distinct deity as late as the Ptolemaic period (323–30 BC).[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c George Hart, The Routledge dictionary of Egyptian gods and goddesses, Psychology Press, 2005, via Google Books
  2. ^ a b c Wilkinson, Richard H. (2003). The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson. pp. 136–137
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